Description

Impressive 19th Ce. Meissen Porcelain –   Under a tree – D94

late 19th or early 20th century. A Meissen figural group of a courting couple modeled as a gallant wearing a puce and saffron costume looking at a watch held above the head of his sweetheart who wears a flowered costume and is seated before an apple tree, its fruit being gathered by a little girl standing behind them. On a oval rockwork base surrounded by a ribbon-tied turquoise oak leaf border. Marked with blue underglaze crossed swords

THIS MEISSEN FIGURINE GROUP IS OF FINEST QUALITY, CAUSED BY STUNNING MODELLING – LOOK AT THE HANDSOME FEATURES, PLEASE, OR AT FINEST PROPORTION OF FIGURINES, FINALLY AT MOST SKILFUL PAINTING    !

MEASURES / DIMENSIONS:

High:   27 cm /10.63 In

Width: 18CM /   7.08 In

Depth: 15 Cm /  5.9 In

MARKS:
THIS MEISSEN FIGURINE GROUP  IS MARKED BY BLUE MEISSEN SWORD MARK (UNDERGLAZED)    OF MIDDLE OF 19TH CENTURY   /   WITH POMMELS ON HILTS  /  FIRST QUALITY   /   MANUFACTURED CIRCA 1860 – 70.
FURTHER THERE ARE THE FOLLOWING MARKS EXISTING:
model number  D 94    |   painter’s number  52
CONDITION:   EXCELLENT

Model By Michel Victor Acier (FRENCH, 1736 – 1799)

The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799) helped shape the Manufactory stylistic identity from 1764 onwards. After Kaendler’s death in 1775, for instance, he bore sole responsibility for the artistic design of Meissen Porcelain®. An exponent of early Classicism, he incorporated Classicist elements into his Rococo-esque figures. The middle classes, now customers of the Manufactory, favoured less fussy, functional porcelains. Acier adapted his decorative schemes to the spirit of the new age accordingly. Domestic scenes such as “The Good Mother” or “The Broken Eggs” were now the order of the day.

Porcelain Manufatory Meissen

Although porcelain was known in Europe from 13th Century, they were always imported from China which made them low grade because Chinese were keeping higher graded porcelain for the selves and were very expensive. So as the rising demand for porcelain over grew alchemists is Europe tried create their own Hard paste Porcelain. Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus collabaoration produced the first European hard paste porcelain at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden in 1708. In 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard paste porcelain company in 1710 at the Albrechtsburg palace in Meissen. “Böttgerporzellan” had more stoneware quality and hardness and was available for purchase in 1713. Initially unmarked, the crossed swords marking was developed in 1720 and has been used since 1723. Since then Miessen has been producing beautifully modeled painted figures and table services. Meissen has been second home to many outstanding sculptors, potters and painters like Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814). It dominated 18th Century porcelain. Meissen celebrated 300 years of excellence in2008 and still is recognized for its high quality Porcelain.